Restoring a 1965 Rockwell Compactool Jointer

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Introduction: Restoring a 1965 Rockwell Compactool Jointer

About: I have been a woodworker for over 40 years, working in a cabinet shop to making custom interiors for executive jets. I have a full shop in my garage and have been making wood pens for the past 3 years. I am ...

My Dad passed away Jan 13, 2014, so this instructable is for you Dad.
Before my Dad passed away he had tools and other items that he wanted to make sure I received as he knew my passion for Woodworking and older collectibles. He stated that the jointer worked and it was given to him by a very good friend of his.
When I got it home I went on line to understand when they were made and what was behind the Rockwell Compactools. I went on vintagemachinery.org to obtain a manual as I knew I was going to take the tool apart to restore it.

http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgIndex/detail.aspx?id=1141&tab=3&sort=2&th=false&fl

Step 1: Tools and Supplies Needed to Restore the Jointer.

1. Mothers Aluminum Polish
https://www.amazon.com

2. Buffing Wheel
https://www.amazon.com

3. Soft Cloth ( sock or cotton t-shirt )

4. Red Paint ( you can use any color )
Lowes rust-oleum

5. 4 feet of 14 gage 3 conductor wire
Lowes

6. Elbow grease ... lot of it.

Step 2: Re-wiring the Jointer

In looking closely at the Jointer I noticed that the wiring needed to be repaired. All of the wire was splitting as shown in figures 1 - 3.
Figures 4 - 5 show the new wiring. I had to remove the motor and solder the new wire in then attach to the switch.
Once re-wired I turned it on and it ran like new, the motor sounded strong and the Jointer had little to no vibration.

Step 3: This Was the Condition When I Received the Jointer

As the surfaces that I wanted to restore was Aluminum I new I wanted to use Mothers Mag and Alum. Polish.
I took the fence off and noticed some light scratches on it and the table so I did the following;

a. I used 400 grit wet and dry sandpaper to remove the scratches
b. I then moved to 600 grit wet and dry sandpaper to start to polish the metal
c. I then used Mothers on a buffing wheel to give it a deep polish
d. In areas that I could not get close enough with the buffing wheel I polished by hand

Step 4: Table and Fence Polished. I Painted the Blade Cover and a Few Knobs and Replaced the Wood Base

This is the completed project which after finishing I was able to show my Dad.. He was impressed and happy that I was able to restore it and still use it today.. When I go out to my shop, I get a smile on my face seeing the Jointer on my shelf..

Thanks Dad..

Love Bruce

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