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25Instructables103,195Views241CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern Washington Joined August 17th, 2009

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  • KellyCraig commented on The Woodgineer's instructable Carbide Woodturning Tool6 hours ago
    Carbide Woodturning Tool

    They are, and I found I could bring them back to sharp just touching them up on my 1" x 42" belt sander (220).

    I was cleaning up some plastic I cut with a hole saw. It took a lot of sanding and polishing to get it back to mirror using sharp knives or my HSS scrapers. On a whim, I tried my carbide scraper and it produced finished surfaces quickly. I was VERY pleased. From that, building a few more would be well worth my time.

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  • Cyclonic Separator Shop-Vac With Secondary Water Filtration (Wet Scrubber) Made From Junk.. This Is Version Mark 2 of the Cyclonic Dust Collector Shop-Vac.

    The assertion water filters are flaws is only accurate in some circumstancesAs a contractor, I took on all kinds of jobs. One, about ten or twelve years ago, was to remove the paint from cedar shingles in the course of repairing shingled exterior walls on the oldest Queen Ann in Olympia, Washington.To perform the task, I used a tool called a Paint Shaver Pro. Essentially, this is an angle grinder with a head on which mounts three carbide scrapers. This awesome little tool will remove every layer of paint from a square foot of siding in about thirty seconds. Needless to say, it generates a LOT of dust. Much of that, in this instance, was, probably, lead paint.The Paint Shaver Pro had to be run with a vacuum, not only to capture dust, but to keep the tool cool, so it didn’t bur...

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    The assertion water filters are flaws is only accurate in some circumstancesAs a contractor, I took on all kinds of jobs. One, about ten or twelve years ago, was to remove the paint from cedar shingles in the course of repairing shingled exterior walls on the oldest Queen Ann in Olympia, Washington.To perform the task, I used a tool called a Paint Shaver Pro. Essentially, this is an angle grinder with a head on which mounts three carbide scrapers. This awesome little tool will remove every layer of paint from a square foot of siding in about thirty seconds. Needless to say, it generates a LOT of dust. Much of that, in this instance, was, probably, lead paint.The Paint Shaver Pro had to be run with a vacuum, not only to capture dust, but to keep the tool cool, so it didn’t burn out. The problem was, a vacuum filter would plug in a couple minutes. The better (finer micron) the filter, the quicker it would plug. To solve the problem, I built a water scrubber using a thirty gallon drum, a 3-M scrub pad and some plastic piping. I instaled the water scrubber between the vacuum and the Paint Shaver, because I wanted to reduce the frequent need to clean the filter.Details on the construction of my system are:1) The intake pipe, to which the pick-up hose attached, ran to just an inch or so off the bottom of the drum.2) The drum was about forty inches tall and had a removable top, sealed via metal band clamp.3) I poured water about twelve inches deep in the barrel, give or take a few inches.4) The 3-M scrub pad, like the type used for buffers, floated on top the water, to act as a baffle. Of course, it had a hole in it so it could slip over the pipe running to the bottom of the barrel.5) The vacuum pipe was only about six inches long and pulled air off the top of the barrel, well above the intake inlet and baffle.6) A sealed top was installed, and both the intake pipe and the vacuum hose pipe ran through it.The water filter increased run time of my large shop vac from a few minutes to about twenty or longer. The only problem was, you ended up with some real nasty mud, AND it foamed like a kid’s first laundry attempt.I came across an article about Oneida’s Dust Deputy and, after reading about it and other cyclone systems, took the risk and bought the metal version. I still have it today and use it religiously. In fact, it inspired me to buy three more cyclones for my shop dust collectors.Putting the two systems together, like in this ible, was a GREAT idea and, probably, would create one heck of a fine vacuum system. Just switching to the little Dust Deputy let me get the same performance (run time) I got with the water bath, and it allowed me to switch to a much smaller vacuum.Keep in mind, our old cars did great with oil bath filters, and many spray booths use water filtration systems, so it is a highly workable solution, if done right.Again, great job ibler.

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  • KellyCraig commented on noahw's instructable How to Polish Resin6 weeks ago
    How to Polish Resin

    While at the autoparts picking up buff compounds, pick up a bottle of plastic polish. You could even pick up a headlight lens polishing kit. They are perfect for the final polish on clear surfaces and, like other things in this ible, can be applied by hand.I have a few different bottles in my polishing area. One is from McGuires and another is the Mother's brand.

    If you are going to do very much polishing, consider getting some zip-lock bags to put the different buff pads in, so you can label the bag with the compound you used.You can always use a more coarse material, but you can't go back to a finer one. So the labeled bags keep you from contaminating the polishing wheels, heads and so forth with more coarse abrasives.

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  • KellyCraig commented on AroundHome's instructable Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw7 weeks ago
    Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw

    I find it nothing less than comical that people bad math certain woods. It was even worse, years back. Today, many know they just didn't know (there is no bad wood (see note)).___________________________NOTE: If you can't make furniture from it, try turning it. If you can't turn it, cast it in epoxy and play with it.. . . .

    Sorry, but after several decades of sawdust making, Wikipedia loses and milling remains cutting, surfacing and shaping wood.

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  • PVC Extended Shade Frame for Craft Show Tents

    REALLY great tips. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on NikilH's instructable Poor Man's Buffing Wheel2 months ago
    Poor Man's Buffing Wheel

    I bought several packages of abrasive buff wheels and a package of buff wheels I use with my many commercial compounds and other things, like chromium oxide, baby powder, corn starch, diatomaceous earth, Bon Ami scrub powder and so on. That aside, I'll have to play with your ible idea to see if I can get this to fly on my two speed AirHandler buffer.ThanksP.S. One of my otherwise good wheels no longer worked on the arbor, since the hole had enlarged too much. On a whim, I threw some hot glue around the hole and it's been going strong ever since.

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    • Heavy Duty, Mobile Shop Cart From a Sheet of Plywood
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  • Shop Eye Glass Storage (Ceiling Mount- Adjustable)

    The other things aside, you hit the nail on the head - this site about sharing.My little shop is eighteen hundred square feet. In addition to the usual cabinet, band and miter saws, lathes and other woodworking equipment, it houses a carving machine, over-arm pin router, an electroplating station, a low RPM (less than ten) painting lathe, airless and HVLP spray guns and so on. The tools and equipment in my shop get used on a daily basis, since they are the means to the end of making a living (or buying more toys, uh, tools). As such, when I go out in the shop, it is, with few exceptions, more often with the idea of making a little money than documenting a process to donate to instructibles.Things like the eye glass rack in this instructible are, as a rule, done spur of the moment and o...

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    The other things aside, you hit the nail on the head - this site about sharing.My little shop is eighteen hundred square feet. In addition to the usual cabinet, band and miter saws, lathes and other woodworking equipment, it houses a carving machine, over-arm pin router, an electroplating station, a low RPM (less than ten) painting lathe, airless and HVLP spray guns and so on. The tools and equipment in my shop get used on a daily basis, since they are the means to the end of making a living (or buying more toys, uh, tools). As such, when I go out in the shop, it is, with few exceptions, more often with the idea of making a little money than documenting a process to donate to instructibles.Things like the eye glass rack in this instructible are, as a rule, done spur of the moment and on a whim, to solve some problem. Generally, all my shiny-thing-attention is, at least for the moment, focused on solving the problem.In the end, it boils down to that I have/had the choice of not producing an instructible at all, or taking pictures of a completed project, then taking the time to write about it and post here. Were it otherwise, it is more than probable you and others would never see many of my completed or future projects.All that said, I just built another cart for a new sander. During the build, I attempted to provide as many photos as I felt would help others build one, from an instructible. A review and critique of that ible would be helpful.https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Heavy-Duty-Mobile-Shop-Cart/

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  • Shop Eye Glass Storage (Ceiling Mount- Adjustable)

    Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, it, like too many things I post about, was done long before it became an instructable.Guess I need to come up with something else I can store hanging from the ceiling.

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  • Separate Hydrogen and Oxygen From Water Through Electrolysis

    Of course, you are going to have a circuit breaker in the system to protect the wiring. If using 14 gauge, that means you'd use a 15 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be about 1800 watts.If using 12 gauge, that means a 20 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be 2,400 watts.Things like the water heater use 10 gauge and require a 30 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be 3,600 watts.For each gauge wire above, the amperage would trip the breakers for the corresponding wire gauges immediately. Even the main breaker of houses around here can handle only 200 amps.To play with that kind of amperage, and assuming 10 gauge wires, you'd have to be running no more than about 34 volts, but you'd have to go there without any breakers.[amps x volt = watts]

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  • KellyCraig commented on Pricklysauce's instructable Branding Nails2 months ago
    Branding Nails

    Great job on both the creations and the ible. Ingenius, even. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on imamanda's instructable Electroformed Turquoise Earrings2 months ago
    Electroformed Turquoise Earrings

    Great ible.Just for reference, when done with the plating process, there is no reason to waste distilled water neutralizing the bath covering plated items, or to rinse off the soda-water mix.Save your distilled water for topping off your plating bath.____________________As to protecting against the copper turning fingers green, many people use ProtectaClear and claim success. It's spendy, but a four ounce can goes a long ways, and if it works. . . .

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  • KellyCraig followed NurdRage2 months ago
      • Make a Tritium Nuclear Battery or Radioisotope Photovoltaic Generator
      • Recover Copper and Fully Recycle Spent Copper Chloride PCB Etchant
      • $50 Vacuum Pump That Can Boil Water at Room Temperature
  • KellyCraig commented on nathb1028's instructable Freeze Dry at Home3 months ago
    Freeze Dry at Home

    Thanks for sharing.I looked into freeze drying years ago and learned the Aztecs used to do it by merely taking their goods up into the mountains, where it was freezing and the air pressure was lower than where the food was grown, so I assume you don't have to get it down very low to start seeing results.From that, I wonder if a common automotive vacuum gauge have any value in monitoring the level of vacuum? Meanwhile, at a different ranch, I use polypropylene bags for my copper plating processes. The plating material has to roll off the copper or other anode in the bag, then through it and on to the item being plated in a plating solution. From that, my next "I wonder" is, would a polypropylene bag would make a handy container for holding the desiccant, to reduce the likelih...

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    Thanks for sharing.I looked into freeze drying years ago and learned the Aztecs used to do it by merely taking their goods up into the mountains, where it was freezing and the air pressure was lower than where the food was grown, so I assume you don't have to get it down very low to start seeing results.From that, I wonder if a common automotive vacuum gauge have any value in monitoring the level of vacuum? Meanwhile, at a different ranch, I use polypropylene bags for my copper plating processes. The plating material has to roll off the copper or other anode in the bag, then through it and on to the item being plated in a plating solution. From that, my next "I wonder" is, would a polypropylene bag would make a handy container for holding the desiccant, to reduce the likelihood of contact with the food?__________________________SIDE NOTE: As a kid, I worked a truck stop in a small farming town. We repaired a lot of tractor tires. They were filled with calcium chloride and I learned, very quickly, it would shrink a brand new pair of boots very quickly. So, even if it's in a water solution, once that water evaporates, it'll be more than happy to reach out and grab some more - from your soon to be ruined new boots.There you go, another ible explaining how to "grease" your new boots (replace lost moisture with oil or melted grease). Fun times?

    I'm a garage sale junkie. One of the things I like to pick up, for a buck or two, is nebulizers. They are used to deliver small amounts of medicinal product to individuals with health problems.After I get one, I pull the cover and swap the hoses so, instead of working as a lightweight compressor, the draw a vacuum.With the cover back on, I've been able to use them to pull the air from vacuum bags using a home made sealer I made from Corian(ish) and Plexi(ish) materials.Used in conjunction with a thermal sealer, the vacuum and sealer allow me to buy and use any company's bags (up to about 16" wide, for my unit). It beats being limited to some companies expensive, and often undersized, proprietary bags.

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  • KellyCraig followed Dunkiedoo3 months ago
      • PVC Extended Shade Frame for Craft Show Tents
      • Car Roof Rack Cross Bars
      • Tortilla Press
    • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders
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      13 comments
  • KellyCraig commented on Radical Geezer's instructable Build the Best Tomato Cages Ever!4 months ago
    Build the Best Tomato Cages Ever!

    So, why on earth do hardware stores sell those tiny tomato cages? They are worthless anywhere real tomato plants grow.Cages like this could be marketed because they could be sold in packages of four panels each. They protect the plant from wind and the holes are large enough you can reach through them to pluck fruit.

    Based on decades of woodwork, working around cedar mills and handyman work, you are right - treated fir trumps cedar every time, for ground contact. For reference:1) Cedar will not take treatment as well as fir; and,2) Wood used above ground dries and shrinks, which causes cracking and splitting. For treating such woods, the best treatment is non-hardening oils. Unlike surface coats, they move with the wood, as it expands and contract with moisture. Too, it will not allow moisture in, then hold it in.To make the best use of oil, thin it, so it will penetrate the wood. Then apply it regularly. If the wood soaks it up, keep adding. Oil does not evaporate, though it may appear to. Instead, it wicks deeper and deep into the wood.When the oil saturates the wood, it swells it, just like ...

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    Based on decades of woodwork, working around cedar mills and handyman work, you are right - treated fir trumps cedar every time, for ground contact. For reference:1) Cedar will not take treatment as well as fir; and,2) Wood used above ground dries and shrinks, which causes cracking and splitting. For treating such woods, the best treatment is non-hardening oils. Unlike surface coats, they move with the wood, as it expands and contract with moisture. Too, it will not allow moisture in, then hold it in.To make the best use of oil, thin it, so it will penetrate the wood. Then apply it regularly. If the wood soaks it up, keep adding. Oil does not evaporate, though it may appear to. Instead, it wicks deeper and deep into the wood.When the oil saturates the wood, it swells it, just like water does. This will close small cracks and splits, and stop new ones from appearing, due to additional drying.

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    A couple were throwing away a pickup load (literally) of plastics. I rescued the plastic before it ever hit the dumpster and am using some for this project, as well as a variation which incorporates at least six angles on one piece of plastic.Since I was into making a few, I figured I'd make several sets for friends and an associate or two. THAT is where a CNC, with a trim router, would REALLY shine. It could even label each one with it's angle(s).

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    Yep. Shows to go you, you should always have your mind fully on whatever you're doing. I suspect I was thinking about bandsaw cuts at the same time I was tossing in a tid bit about taking advantage of your table saw for some of the cuts. Of course, they don't use sixty teeth per inch, but do rely on TPI for various thicknesses of wood, and for smoothness of cuts.You wouldn't have to torch the cuts. They'd already be melted [and probably welded back together].

    David, you might clarify, if my take is correct. You are proposing a method of laying out the lines that does not require buying or owning a protractor and bevel gauge, or an adjustable angle gauge?If so, you REALLY should do an ible, because it would be helpful to many.If you go that route, an explanation of why that approach is useful would be helpful too.

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    Thanks for the catch, dwieland. That was a bit obvious to be left hanging out there. I can only imagine what a 60 TIP, 10" miter blade would look like and cost. At least you'd never have to sand anything it cut.

    David, many of us barely know what trig is. For example, I never graduated from high school, and I avoided classes on "complicated" things like chemistry, geometry and so on. As such, a bit more information to help those of us not familiar with such things would be helpful. Maybe an instructible using your, more simple approach?

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    • THE FIRST, HONEST WINE STOPPER  (or How to Establish or Grow Your Shop)
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      1 comments
    • Realistic Copper Plating Without Electricity (Paint Formula)
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      14 favorites
      0 comments
  • Face Clamp Attachment (Get the Most Out of Your Clamps)

    Great innovation and layout. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on fghuertas's instructable Gouge, How to Make5 months ago
    Gouge, How to Make

    When I was polishing colored Plexiglass/Lexon disks cut out with my hole saw, using the square one cut the time I spent to a fraction of the time. Generally, the results did not require further sanding and polishing.I polish about ten disks at a time by fitting them over a carriage bolt the size of the pilot hole and clamping them with a nut, leaving enough bolt to go into the lathe. I use the live center on the opposite end.My 1"x48" belt sander touches the carbide up with just a quick touch on a 220 belt.

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  • KellyCraig commented on barefootbohemian's instructable Drilling Glass6 months ago
    Drilling Glass

    Thanks the short and simple directions. From them one can take key points that will make you a pro (okay, that might be an exaggeration): 1) Keep the tip wet to keep the tip cool (the simple shop towel tip was gold); and,2) Let the drill do the work (BE PATIENT) and DO NOT press hard.I set my big tile saw up with a three pound coffee can hanging off a cord tied to the back of the moving sled. I drop a few rocks in it and it goes slower than I tend to push. The weight of a drill or Dremel might do the same, if [controlled and] allowed to push through on its own.

    As I read further, this reminded me of my tile saw trick (coffee can with weight hanging off the back). Great tip.

    I have a pint of hydroflouric acid and it scares me even more than my big saws and things. Definitely a thing needing great respect.

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  • KellyCraig commented on simplerandom's instructable DIY Ligthbox / Light Table7 months ago
    DIY Ligthbox / Light Table

    What on earth is organic glass?You can also consider using plastic from a dead video monitor. They use nice 1/4" thick acrylic.You'll have to sand it to create a surface that will diffuse the light. Mine uses a power supply and dimmer (12 volt dimmer on the output of the xformer). That way, the light can be powered and controlled, but won't have the increased bulk and weight of a switch, and there isn't a dark spot, if the power supply and switch have to be mounted in the box.Just be sure the power supply can handle the wattage of the LED's you use.

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  • 10 MORE Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use

    Add to the tips, do not wast money on flint or even garnet sandpaper. They dull quickly. Instead, buy aluminum oxide paper.Too, if possible remove the dust as it comes off and it will greatly increase the life and effectiveness of the paper.

    Try bar soap instead. Less messy.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    Love the edit feature [end the "no I don't font].

    I've thought about a slowed down version of a paint shaker, as I stand out in my shop shaking bottles.I, also, am use the plastic carba caps for charging and they work fine. Of course, I just re-install the stock cheap caps for storing charged bottles (need to remember to keep them, since they fit over a woodworking F clamp.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    I didn't worry much about swapping tanks, since I picked mine up, with gauges and an aquarium injector, for five bucks. It might be more to get the same tank back, and I might have to wait, or come back on another day.I'm of old fart status ("they" say), but the tank poses no problem for me or the car. I do try to secure it well, if only because it would make an impressive missile. I know I'm guaranteed 500 charges, but it may be higher (e.g., 700).

    I've been using my system for two or three years now and it, certainly, stomps all over a Soda Stream, which we had, but found to be expensive and too limited in both capacity and uses.I use a 20# tank and I can either swap or refill my tank at the "local" gas supply house about an hour away (we have to travel for shopping anyway). Swaps run me $11.00.I discussed the food quality issue with the supplier and they supply medical grade an welding grade from the same supply._______________________________I'll have to give the double charge a try. I charge at around 45 psi. Thanks for sharing the experiment.I have very good luck storing my bottles. I buy two liter charged water bottles and just swap them out. At about a buck a bottle, I swap them a couple times a year (6ea) and ...

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    I've been using my system for two or three years now and it, certainly, stomps all over a Soda Stream, which we had, but found to be expensive and too limited in both capacity and uses.I use a 20# tank and I can either swap or refill my tank at the "local" gas supply house about an hour away (we have to travel for shopping anyway). Swaps run me $11.00.I discussed the food quality issue with the supplier and they supply medical grade an welding grade from the same supply._______________________________I'll have to give the double charge a try. I charge at around 45 psi. Thanks for sharing the experiment.I have very good luck storing my bottles. I buy two liter charged water bottles and just swap them out. At about a buck a bottle, I swap them a couple times a year (6ea) and I'm still saving hundreds over Soda Stream.Of course, as you point out, I can "sparkle" apple juice or cider, wine or whatever too.Thanks

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  • KellyCraig commented on bravoechonovember1's instructable In-drawer Knife Organizer10 months ago
    In-drawer Knife Organizer

    Mine looked exactly like yours. Now, they are display worthy, as, I suspect, yours will be.I forgot to mention, you can run a search on the Net for "oil, bees wax wood treatments" and find formulas that will serve you till you are old and gray.

    Rub some mineral oil on those knife blades and you'll be amazed how beautiful the wood is. Mix in some bee's wax and Carnuba wax and you have a down town finish. Another plus of the mineral oil is, those cracks may disappear, as the moisture lost from years of drying is replaced with oil.A small bottle of mineral oil only runs a couple bucks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Magnetic Knife Rack1 year ago
    Magnetic Knife Rack

    In addition to a really nice knife rack, you've supported my contention scraps are a myth.;)

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  • Making a Turned-Off-Center Door Stop

    I test drove this using some 2x4's I found laying around the shop and the results were nearly as pleasing as with 2x6's. I added the pictures to provide examples.

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  • KellyCraig commented on AroundHome's instructable Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw1 year ago
    Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw

    One of the steps is easier than you think (meanwhile, back at the ranch, nice video): https://www.instructables.com/id/Band-Saw-Log-Sled/

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  • KellyCraig commented on Kozmicblues69's instructable Level Bracelets1 year ago
    Level Bracelets

    In the near future, I'll be posting a jig I designed for doing this kind of project. It was designed and built to overcome problems my wife was having doing this kind of work. You might look into it, if you do much of this sort of thing.

    Too fun. My wife dabbles in jewelry and now I know what to do with those old vials that, often, slip out of try-squares and such [and were, otherwise] worthless anyway.Thanks

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  • KellyCraig's instructable Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment
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      45 favorites
      8 comments
    • FOR THE SHOP: SIMPLE, EASY ACCESS, CEILING HUNG RAG STORAGE
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  • KellyCraig commented on dave5201's instructable How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer1 year ago
    How to Hide a Wall Wart Transformer

    That is not entirely true. If it were, people would be required to tear out walls to add a ground line, when swapping a dangerously worn outlet.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    I had to run my Bosch for a year, while I waited to get 240 to my cabinet saw. A couple years down the road, it was Groundhog's day, all over again. I spend a lot of years just vacuuming up after the fact and making do. My first big jump in the dust collection world was just installing a couple squirrel cages that allowed me to fire up the leaf blower and clean shop. [Did that during the day once, then pulled the garage door up and discovered I'd just dusted the entire neighborhood, so only did it after dark, after that . ;) ]Today, I have that 240 and the Bosch went the way of craigslist. Today, I have three collectors [even though it's not really that big a shop. Those collectors tend some nice toys, uh, tools (e.g., 8", spiral, long bed jointer, over-arm pin router, a ...

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    I had to run my Bosch for a year, while I waited to get 240 to my cabinet saw. A couple years down the road, it was Groundhog's day, all over again. I spend a lot of years just vacuuming up after the fact and making do. My first big jump in the dust collection world was just installing a couple squirrel cages that allowed me to fire up the leaf blower and clean shop. [Did that during the day once, then pulled the garage door up and discovered I'd just dusted the entire neighborhood, so only did it after dark, after that . ;) ]Today, I have that 240 and the Bosch went the way of craigslist. Today, I have three collectors [even though it's not really that big a shop. Those collectors tend some nice toys, uh, tools (e.g., 8", spiral, long bed jointer, over-arm pin router, a router carving machine, etc.). Regarding all that, it should be noted, I'm sixty-six, and those things didn't appear over night. My passion for fabricating saw dust filled my shop with tools and equipment, as opportunity and need arose. I upgraded them when I could. There are still a few tools I want (okay, that never ends), but I remember [when not wanting that wide bed sander] to appreciate the fact I have a hobby shop many professionals would be happy with.I still build many things, both because I want the money to go to something else and because it just doesn't exist. I still make do with some tools too.The point of this is, take time to look at what you've accomplished. Too, remember, if you lost it all, you could replace it in far less time than it took you to build the first collection. I know this, first hand. My first Unisaw took me fifteen years to acquire. The second, and many times the equipment I had then, took three years.The short of it is, if you want it and give it your passion, you'll have it. If you doubt it, go back to taking time to really think about what you've already accomplished.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    Finally, a common sense approach. Golf course is only a few blocks away, so it's going to take a bit more cooperation.

    That's a great idea. Just a reminder, the idea of the cyclone and dust collector is so you can vacuum without concern about rocks running through the impellers, since they spin out before getting to the collector or leaf vac.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    And building this system [very much] justifies the Super Dust Deputy too. The philosophy which smacks of an event involving my wife about four decades back. I bought a trailer from a guy and, in the course of visiting with him, I learned he did glass etch. I found that interesting and we ended up talking about it in detail. Eventually, he suggested I borrow his air compressor for a few weeks and do some etches the wife would like, then point out I could do more, if I had a compressor too. I got my compressor a few weeks later.I cannot say enough good about cyclone pre-filters. My purchase of a three horse Oneida Gorilla Cyclone was inspired by the performance I experienced with one of the small Dust Deputies for vacuums. Before getting it, vacuuming sheetrock dust would clog the ...

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    And building this system [very much] justifies the Super Dust Deputy too. The philosophy which smacks of an event involving my wife about four decades back. I bought a trailer from a guy and, in the course of visiting with him, I learned he did glass etch. I found that interesting and we ended up talking about it in detail. Eventually, he suggested I borrow his air compressor for a few weeks and do some etches the wife would like, then point out I could do more, if I had a compressor too. I got my compressor a few weeks later.I cannot say enough good about cyclone pre-filters. My purchase of a three horse Oneida Gorilla Cyclone was inspired by the performance I experienced with one of the small Dust Deputies for vacuums. Before getting it, vacuuming sheetrock dust would clog the vacuum filters in five minutes or less. After it, I could get up to a half hour of run time.

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  • KellyCraig commented on pardy73's instructable Edge Lit Acrylic Sign1 year ago
    Edge Lit Acrylic Sign

    Back before lasers were available to the public, that's how we etched our plexi type products. I've done several projects this way and it's easy just using a cheap siphon feed blaster. I run at about forty-five pounds and just use good contact paper for my reist.

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