Dust Cyclone Separator (Shop Vac / Dust Collector) From a CD Spindle Cake Box and Toy Cone. Build Your Own Bucket Shopvac With Built in Cyclonic Separation!

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Introduction: Dust Cyclone Separator (Shop Vac / Dust Collector) From a CD Spindle Cake Box and Toy Cone. Build Your Own Bucket Shopvac With Built in Cyclonic Separation!

About: I like things

You can build a fairly efficient cyclonic dust separator from just a couple CD cases, a toy traffic cone, and some PVC pipe. This dust separator can be attached to a bucket and used with an existing shop-vac.

You can also use this CD case dust separator to build a whole shop-vac entirely from scratch that performs just as well, is compact as, and is cheaper than an off the shelf shop-vac. All you need is a couple CD spindle cases, a toy traffic cone, a bucket, some PVC pipe, and a vacuum cleaner motor.

A friend challenged me to build something out of a CD spindle case and the first thing that came to mind was a cyclonic vacuum cleaner. Strange but true. A few months later, this product emerged.

You can see some video of early prototypes that I made.


To complete the CD case cyclonic separator module you'll need:

1x 50disc CD spindle case 1x 100disc CD spindle case

1x plastic traffic cone (found it at a department store sports/toy section)

3ft of 1 1/4" thin walled PVC pipe

1x 1 1/4" PVC straight union

1x plastic bucket with lid (doesn't necessarily have to be round)

To complete a DIY shop-vac with incorporated CD case cyclonic separator module you'll need in addition:

1x vacuum cleaner motor (can source from any spare vacuum cleaner)

2x 1 1/4" PVC 90 deg elbow 1x 100disc CD spindle case with lid

4x 3" x 13" boards

4x caster wheels

1x toggle switch

1x power cable

Step 1: Source Materials

To complete the CD case cyclonic separator module you'll need:

1x 50disc CD spindle case

1x 100disc CD spindle case

1x plastic traffic cone (found it at a department store sports/toy section)

3ft of 1 1/4" thin walled PVC pipe

1x 1 1/4" PVC straight union

1x plastic bucket with lid (doesn't necessarily have to be round)


To complete a DIY shop-vac with incorporated CD case cyclonic separator module you'll need in addition:

1x vacuum cleaner motor (can source from any spare vacuum cleaner)

2x 1 1/4" PVC 90 deg elbow

1x 100disc CD spindle case with lid

4x 3" x 13" boards

4x caster wheels

1x toggle switch

1x power cable

Step 2: Build Cyclone Subassembly

  1. Start with a 50 CD case spindle. Cut out the base of the spindle (the black portion) such that the PVC pipe can fit through it.
  2. With an extra CD cut a hole in it the same size as the PVC pipe and make a cut to the center of the hole.
  3. Wrap the CD around the pipe and hot glue it in place to act as a spiral ramp.
  4. Cut an oval hole out the side wall (the clear cylinder) of the CD case so the inlet pipe can be inserted into the case
  5. Cut off the base of the traffic cone such that it can fit on top of the CD case
  6. Cut the top off the CD spindle case

Step 3: Assemble and Glue Up the Cyclone Subassembly

  1. Insert PVC pipe into center of CD case and glue in place
  2. Insert PVC pipe into side of CD case and glue in place
  3. Insert the cut CD around the center PVC pipe to act as the spiral ramp and glue in place
  4. Attach traffic cone to CD case and glue in place
  5. cut hole in bottom of traffic cone that is same size as PVC pipe diameter
  6. Cut top off of 100 CD case and cut hole in bottom of the spindle
  7. Glue the 100 CD case to the cyclone assembly to reinforce the cyclone structure

Step 4: Assemble the Vacuum Module and Mount All Assemblies to Bucket Lid

  1. Fit vacuum motor along with AC switch and wire into a 100 CD case.
  2. Cut a hole in top and bottom of CD case to insert PVC Pipe to top and bottom and glue these in place.
  3. Cut holes in bucket to mount Cyclone sub assembly and Vacuum Module
  4. Connect with PVC pipe, the suction side of the vacuum module to the top pipe of the cyclone assembly
  5. Route with PVC pipe, the exhaust side of the vacuum module to the outside of the bucket

Step 5: Make Wheel Base for Vacuum and Add Vacuum Hose

  1. Using any type of wood make a square frame that is the same diameter as the base of the bucket
  2. Drill holes on each four corners of the wooden base and insert castor wheels
  3. Attach vacuum hose to the inlet of the cyclone module
  4. Insert a bag into bucket to catch the falling dust then test vacuum for leaks and performance

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    18 Discussions

    Great project. Has anyone worked on a hydro-cyclone? There tend to be very much smaller than air/dust extraction.

    1/ I am looking at recovery of debri and paint flakes from the water after water blasting before it runs into the stream.

    2/ Removal of grit from water extracted from the river BEFORE it goes through the water blaster.

    Different sizes, velocities etc is my understanding.

    Thanks Murray

    1 reply

    I did a lot of work with hydro-cyclones in the paper industry doing just what you are asking about. We had "Centri-Cleaners" tm over the years from 2 inch to 4 feet in diameter. The smaller ones were used to remove anything from potato starch from wash water in potato chip plants to sand and grit in paper pulp prior to paper production. Sand and grit removal was the original design criteria in the '50s for the pulp and paper industry and is the most common use still today. Under the right operating conditions a hydro-cyclone will remove 99% of any heavier than water contaminate in water flows. (If it floats it won't separate from the water flow)

    Very good idea, because you did join the vacuum cleaner outlet and docked in the bucket.

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    perfo

    7 months ago

    Nice instructable. I think you rose to the challenge.

    If you are interested, I have another challenge for you.

    I think you'd be able to get rid of the vacuum motor and build a centrifugal fan possibly out of CD cases and boxes..

    2 replies

    hahaha thanks! ... and an electric motor too :) Actually people do build centrifugal fans out of them but they are in the form of "Tesla turbine" which are boundary effect blowers -not enough pressure for a vaccum as they are low pressure / high efficiency.

    You can build em out of ply so CD cases shoudl be do able. Make them backward facign centirfugal and they will handle particles no prob..

    Very cool. I've been looking for cyclone ideas for my sand blasting cabinet. Love the addition of the vacuum which makes the footprint smaller. Keep us updated on the water separator. AND finally a use for the CD/DVD spindles I've been saving for the past 10 years (I knew they could eventually be repurposed)

    1 reply

    Thanks for comment :) I've been hoarding these containers for far too long - I had to do something with them. I'll post another instructables when I get the bugs worked out of the next version.

    Great idea, can you provide a picture or description that shows the setup with the separator and a shop vac?

    Thank you,

    Hunter

    4 replies

    Yeah, well, maybe if I had watched the first video I wouldn't have asked a stupid question...

    No problemo let me know if you have any questions. I've onto the next iteration that has secondary water filtration but it isn't ready for prime time yet.

    Best,
    Jimmy

    Can I come drink beer with you and your friend as this is awesome :)

    That would be great! Thanks for the positive energy :)

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    Kdemon

    7 months ago

    Where did you get all the CD cases from?

    1 reply

    Hi, For this I actually bought a case of 20 empty CD cases for experimentation. They were about a dollar a piece. Before that I collected some from friends.

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    perfo

    7 months ago

    Nice instructable. I think you rose to the challenge.

    If you are interested, I have another challenge for you.

    I think you'd be able to get rid of the vacuum motor and build a centrifugal fan possibly out of CD cases and boxes..

    Thank you! I aim to please :) The next iteration will be even cooler! :)