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4CommentsEastern PA, USAJoined October 31st, 2007
Electrical Engineer, Retired

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  • DIY Magnetic Hand-Saw Guide - Extremely Accurate Cuts!

    It might not be square because the glue under the magnet may have a slope to it. Glue tends not to evenly distribute unless the pieces are clamped square while the glue dries. Thank you again for your instructable.

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  • DIY Magnetic Hand-Saw Guide - Extremely Accurate Cuts!

    Your idea is simple & effective. Comments/questions.You use a square cut piece of wood to mount the magnet, but how do you know the magnet is square after you glue it? Thought about embedding the magnet in the wood? If slightly below the surface the squareness is preserved and scratching of the saw minimized. The addition of material to cover the wood would still be a good idea.Thanks for the instructable.

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  • TRIPLE YOUR SOLAR ARRAY'S OUTPUT!

    Yes, test in the sun! This Instructable presents an interesting concept, as evidenced by MIT testing of similar concept designs. It may have merit, but I am addressing a serious flaw in the testing method.An artificial light source was used that probably was relatively close to the solar cells which means that the light waves hitting the solar cells were in an angle of acceptance meaning that the solar cells saw angled light waves from the lamp as well as perpendicular (0 angle) light waves. Out in the sun the cells would only receive the perpendicular light waves because the sun is a great distance from earth and no angled waves would be received.If the lamp could be shuttered or somehow eliminate the angled light waves so only perpendicular waves struck the cells the output difference...

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    Yes, test in the sun! This Instructable presents an interesting concept, as evidenced by MIT testing of similar concept designs. It may have merit, but I am addressing a serious flaw in the testing method.An artificial light source was used that probably was relatively close to the solar cells which means that the light waves hitting the solar cells were in an angle of acceptance meaning that the solar cells saw angled light waves from the lamp as well as perpendicular (0 angle) light waves. Out in the sun the cells would only receive the perpendicular light waves because the sun is a great distance from earth and no angled waves would be received.If the lamp could be shuttered or somehow eliminate the angled light waves so only perpendicular waves struck the cells the output differences between the "flat" cells and the "angled" cells would not be anywhere triple. With too steep an angle the cells might even block the light. A difficult setup to try and create. The better method is to test in with the sun.Retest in the sun. You will get real world results. Place the lux meter in-between the standard array and the experimental array. Height of the meter will no longer matter because of the extreme distance to the sun. Experiment with cell angles also to find the optimum angle vs experimental array output.You have a good start. I am looking forward to your posting of new results based on testing in the sun.

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