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  • ArthurS18 commented on PartsAndRestoration's instructable How to Restore a Band Saw2 months ago
    How to Restore a Band Saw

    Almost any high quality power tool can be rebuilt, and that started out as a very nice bandsaw. It wasn't mentioned, but I'll bet that saw still worked fine despite the battered appearance.I found an old Craftsman bandsaw beside a dumpster and rebuilt it last summer. Mine is nothing like the professional level quality of that big Delta saw, but the mechanisms are all very similar. In my case some savage had tried and failed to fix it several times so there was a mishmash of missing and incorrectly assembled parts. My saw is 30-40 years old but I was still able to find a manual online. There is probably a manual available for that big Delta too. The parts diagram in the manual was crucial for me to figure out how the washers and bearings on the drive axle were originally stacked. Otherwi...

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    Almost any high quality power tool can be rebuilt, and that started out as a very nice bandsaw. It wasn't mentioned, but I'll bet that saw still worked fine despite the battered appearance.I found an old Craftsman bandsaw beside a dumpster and rebuilt it last summer. Mine is nothing like the professional level quality of that big Delta saw, but the mechanisms are all very similar. In my case some savage had tried and failed to fix it several times so there was a mishmash of missing and incorrectly assembled parts. My saw is 30-40 years old but I was still able to find a manual online. There is probably a manual available for that big Delta too. The parts diagram in the manual was crucial for me to figure out how the washers and bearings on the drive axle were originally stacked. Otherwise a bandsaw is a simple machine, so cleaning and greasing are the biggest parts of the overhaul job.All bandsaws do have consumables and wear parts. The blades and rubber tires will be specific to the guide wheels of individual saws, but those parts are specific to the guide wheels—NOT the brand. Any 14" wheel will use a commonly available 14" tire. The same is true of the little guide blocks that keep the blade aligned at the cutting area. Likewise, I could read the bearing numbers and order more of the same bearing sets. That Delta saw looks like it was built in the 1940s-1950s and I'm sure all of its wear parts are commonly available.I've overhauled quite a few power tools so I have an estimate of the cost and savings in doing so. Start by looking at the current price for something of equal quality. It's tough to compare a 70 year old saw, but depending on features that one might be worth up to $2800 new. Suppose you don't need a $2800 saw. A $1200 saw is still really nice. It typically costs 1/3 of the new price for me to overhaul a power tool. I would aim at $400-500 in total cost, meanwhile hoping to get $2800 worth of saw even though I'd be perfectly happy with a $1200 saw. If that Delta saw has all new wear components, wire and motor it is worth $1200 regardless of its age.

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  • ArthurS18 commented on ArthurS18's instructable My Rebuilt Boat Galley2 years ago
    My Rebuilt Boat Galley

    So true. I don't quite live onboard full time but I do spend months on end in this space. The art of cramming stuff, sort of like a life-long game of tetris, is universally practiced on boats. I've spent many years installing things and learning to leave barely enough access for repairs without wasting an inch.Drawers are actually somewhat wasteful on boats. There is always a bit of space surrounding the drawers above, behind and below that can't be used, so the chest style hole in the top of a cabinet becomes more common as boats get smaller. On the other hand, I had so much wasted space around the diesel stove that this installation probably tripled my trinket and utensil storage.There is an oddly shaped void behind my new drawer stack and you can bet that I've been plotting about wha...

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    So true. I don't quite live onboard full time but I do spend months on end in this space. The art of cramming stuff, sort of like a life-long game of tetris, is universally practiced on boats. I've spent many years installing things and learning to leave barely enough access for repairs without wasting an inch.Drawers are actually somewhat wasteful on boats. There is always a bit of space surrounding the drawers above, behind and below that can't be used, so the chest style hole in the top of a cabinet becomes more common as boats get smaller. On the other hand, I had so much wasted space around the diesel stove that this installation probably tripled my trinket and utensil storage.There is an oddly shaped void behind my new drawer stack and you can bet that I've been plotting about what could possibly be installed back there. My counter top is removable with minimal hassle so that I can work in the space again. I've learned the hard way what should be glued in place and what should be removable.

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