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28Instructables120,164Views281CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern WashingtonJoined August 17th, 2009

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  • Pallet Wood Clog Work Boots (with a Wheel in the Heel!)

    I have, absolutely, no interest in making these. However, when I saw them I had come here and comment to give you a high five for a job well done. On all levels.These are just too fun.Excellent work on both the project and ible.

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  • KellyCraig commented on jschap1's instructable How to Keep Your Files Organized4 weeks ago
    How to Keep Your Files Organized

    THUMBS UPThis addresses one of the things that have driven me nuts for thirty plus years - people scattering files all over their computers, and dumping everything into a single folder.First, I create a main folder I labeled "Documents and Data." This stems from the days when the Gates crowd were so much smarter than us they arranged things so reloading or repairing the O.S. left the O.S. Documents folder at its original state - empty of your thousands of files.From there, I create sub folders in common, to me, categories, like "Personal," "Clients and Customers," "Friends" "Hobby," "Home," "Automotive," "Health" and "General Reference."Once I have those, I begin building sub-folders, such as &quo...

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    THUMBS UPThis addresses one of the things that have driven me nuts for thirty plus years - people scattering files all over their computers, and dumping everything into a single folder.First, I create a main folder I labeled "Documents and Data." This stems from the days when the Gates crowd were so much smarter than us they arranged things so reloading or repairing the O.S. left the O.S. Documents folder at its original state - empty of your thousands of files.From there, I create sub folders in common, to me, categories, like "Personal," "Clients and Customers," "Friends" "Hobby," "Home," "Automotive," "Health" and "General Reference."Once I have those, I begin building sub-folders, such as "Projects," "Legal," "Poems and Stories" or what have you.For the General Reference folder, I have folders like, "Electronics," "Magnetics," "Granite Work," "Remodeling," "Auto Repairs," Tools & Equipment" and so on.In short, I have sub-folder upon sub-folder, to allow my to categorize and organize files.The index of one of my main folders, containing all documents in various formats, prints out to over three hundred sixty pages. In spite of that, I can find documents I and others need in a relatively short time.

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  • KellyCraig commented on tomatoskins's instructable Make a Wood Tap From a Bolt4 weeks ago
    Make a Wood Tap From a Bolt

    True. If you, for example, use a ratchet to hold the tap, hold the ratchet at the head, rather than out at the handle.Too, I've used my cordless drill to tap many holes.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Withered Perception's instructable DIY $5.00 Sandblaster2 months ago
    DIY $5.00 Sandblaster

    Very clever. I think I'll build a version and keep it in my sandblast cabinet for specialty work.

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  • Pallet Wood Coasters With Diamond Pattern

    Great instructable and nice end product, BUT. . . If only for the instructable, it would have been nice to see you using a push shoe, while running the pieces through the table saw.When I was your age, way back when I was quick, I would not have been, and you wouldn't either, be quick enough to beat a kickback.After you get used to using shoes, it's hard not to. They don't slow me down enough to be notable, and they make the job a WHOLE lot more comfortable, let alone safe.Next is, the warning of what can happen when you run glue ups like yours through a planner. Better men than either of us have lost good planers to such. A few suffered worse than tool damage. Others just had to change their shorts.Many experienced sawdust maker has done it for years, only to get bit by the practice...

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    Great instructable and nice end product, BUT. . . If only for the instructable, it would have been nice to see you using a push shoe, while running the pieces through the table saw.When I was your age, way back when I was quick, I would not have been, and you wouldn't either, be quick enough to beat a kickback.After you get used to using shoes, it's hard not to. They don't slow me down enough to be notable, and they make the job a WHOLE lot more comfortable, let alone safe.Next is, the warning of what can happen when you run glue ups like yours through a planner. Better men than either of us have lost good planers to such. A few suffered worse than tool damage. Others just had to change their shorts.Many experienced sawdust maker has done it for years, only to get bit by the practice on down the road. Several, I've been in discussions with, say they never did it again.On a final note, and for those unaware, the pin with the nylon on it, in the photos of the routering, is to keep all hell from breaking loose. For routering things like this, these pins are a must and all good router tables have them. They allow you to feed the stock into the bit, by pivoting it, and keep the bit from grabbing the pieces and tossing it.

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  • KellyCraig commented on NLED-Projects's instructable LED Pixel Edge Lit Acrylic Sign3 months ago
    LED Pixel Edge Lit Acrylic Sign

    On the sandblast, consider old school approaches too. For example:1) Cover a pieces of plastic or glass with contact paper, to act as the resistance to keep the sand from etching areas of an item you intend to keep clear. I found the cream colors worked best, since they showed pen, pencil and graphite trace paper well. Even better than white.2) Trace lettering or a picture on to the contact paper by taping a piece of graphite trace paper over it, then the picture you want to transfer over that. 3) Use a pen or pencil to trace your letters and/or image.4) Check for misses by lifting one corner of the taped trace paper and pattern and, if okay, remove them. Carefully, if you want to use them again (you can get several runs out of the graphite/carbon paper.5) Use and Exact type blade to ...

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    On the sandblast, consider old school approaches too. For example:1) Cover a pieces of plastic or glass with contact paper, to act as the resistance to keep the sand from etching areas of an item you intend to keep clear. I found the cream colors worked best, since they showed pen, pencil and graphite trace paper well. Even better than white.2) Trace lettering or a picture on to the contact paper by taping a piece of graphite trace paper over it, then the picture you want to transfer over that. 3) Use a pen or pencil to trace your letters and/or image.4) Check for misses by lifting one corner of the taped trace paper and pattern and, if okay, remove them. Carefully, if you want to use them again (you can get several runs out of the graphite/carbon paper.5) Use and Exact type blade to cut out the design. I mark the pieces I want removed to reveal the areas to be blasted, to make it easier to keep track, when doing complex patterns.NOTE: If the tip of the Exacto blade breaks, use a stone to bring it back to a point. They break VERY easily, but by just re-pointing the blade, it can, literally, go for years.6) Using a fine blast media, turn the compressor down to a maximum of about 40 PSI and etch the areas where the resistance (contact paper) was removed. Keep the nozzle ninety degrees to less the likelihood of blowing the resistance loose.NOTE: Lower air pressure takes longer to etch, but can allow you to monitor the etching coming in. Too, it's perfect for adding shading, which can be done by leaving strategic pieces of the resistance on, then lifting them and etching again, at about half the pressure (e.g., 22 PSI). Scroll through my Flicker page to see examples of simple etches using this approach.https://www.flickr.com/photos/functional_art/

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  • 7 Winter Life Hacks to Keep You Warm

    I find the debate about air movement just short of comical. If the fan draws air up, the air already there would have to move elsewhere. As such, the mere fact there is air movement should be the critical issue. Of course, there is the issue of having air blow directly on you, but in each house I've lived in, the fans were situated in locations that made this a non-issue.

    Just keep in mind, doors have gaps to allow air movement for heating and cooling. Normally, the only doors that fit tight around all four edges are doors going to the exterior.If your furnace return were in a room with the door sealed and the room had no vent, the furnace wouldn't be able to transfer air throughout the home. And, of course, if the room had a vent to allow air to return to the furnace, there would be no gain in sealing the door.

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  • KellyCraig commented on bekathwia's instructable 13 Ideas for Diffusing LEDs4 months ago
    13 Ideas for Diffusing LEDs

    On Chinese purchases, I remodeled my kitchen a few years back and saved a small fortune ording light bars from other than U.S. sellers.When I wired the kitche (walls all still open), I jumped sinks and so on so all under-cabinet lights could be on one circuit. I wired the under-cabinet lights for halogens, since LED's were still expensive. As such, dimming would have been done via a 120 volt dimmer. LED's dropped and I gambled on a Chinese supplier purchase from LightingWill-dot-com. The lights were perfect, but I couldn't bury a xformer in the wall and dimming at the lights was not practical, but which I would have had to do using a standard power supply (rectifier). By switching to a magnetic transformer (much more expensive), I was able to dim through it, rather than via the out...

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    On Chinese purchases, I remodeled my kitchen a few years back and saved a small fortune ording light bars from other than U.S. sellers.When I wired the kitche (walls all still open), I jumped sinks and so on so all under-cabinet lights could be on one circuit. I wired the under-cabinet lights for halogens, since LED's were still expensive. As such, dimming would have been done via a 120 volt dimmer. LED's dropped and I gambled on a Chinese supplier purchase from LightingWill-dot-com. The lights were perfect, but I couldn't bury a xformer in the wall and dimming at the lights was not practical, but which I would have had to do using a standard power supply (rectifier). By switching to a magnetic transformer (much more expensive), I was able to dim through it, rather than via the output, allowing me to install dimable LED bars all around my counters (set back about 1-1/2" so the light hit the end of the counter).

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    • Making and Using Inexpensive Buff Compounds for Wood, Plasics and Resin
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  • Making and Using Inexpensive Buff Compounds for Wood, Plasics and Resin

    O, regarding rottenstone, some lumber yards carry it, as would, as you suspepect, some paint supply stores. Diatomaceious earth may be available wherever you buy things to get rid of bug type pests. You want the raw stuff. Many bags of floor cleaner are nothing more than diatomaceous earth, but I don't know how fine they are. You, of course, want fine stuff. Avoid the filter material from pool supplies and such because it's been crystalized by putting it under high heat (which is also the type that is leathal to us and animals, whereas the raw is not).Cameo or Bar Keeper's Friend might work too. Some say the BonAmi scratches less, so it would stand that it must be more fine. Regardless, they are stainless steel cleaning powders and available at the local grocery.

    OBillo, I'm a fanatic about mineral oil and bread or cutting boards. I bought a butcher block cart some years back and it had been sorely neglected, to the point the joints were separating and cracks and splits were showing from the wood shrinking over the years. I slathered mineral oil on and kept adding it wherever it soaked in. Once it quit readily taking in oil, I slathered a VERY general layer on and just walked away.I came back to the butcherblock a few weeks later and, of course, the oil had all soaked in. Too, it had wicked in to the point it expanded the wood back to near what it was when the moisture content was higher. As a result, ALL the cracks, splits and separations were no longer visible.

    Which might go to remind us, sometimes, old, simple technology can be as good as the new technology, or even the best. Too, it's kind of like the "new," high tech heaters pushed on commercials, that, suspiciously, seem to operate an awful lot like the old infrared technology.

    You've got the name of this game, Obillo - expirimentaiton. The commercial stuff uses mineral oil, and it works. I treated my old kitchen knives with a beeswax, mineral oil finish and they look better than they did out of the box forty years ago.Obviously, though thick, vasoline would melt like the wax does under friction, so it's all fair game. I do plan on test driving baking soda, corn starch and common flour as buff powders soon. Somewhere in all this, there's room for Bon Ami (sp?) and other "no scratch" cleaners too.

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  • KellyCraig's instructable WEATHERPROOF OUTDOOR HOLIDAY LIGHTING CLIPS's weekly stats: 4 months ago
    • WEATHERPROOF OUTDOOR HOLIDAY LIGHTING CLIPS
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    • Making Unique, Light Catching Laminated Wood, Plastic and Copper Ornamental Turnings
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      4 comments
  • Basic Wood Veneering Techniques Made Easy!

    Looks like a good place to play with your vacuum experiments too.Curious - when looking into veneers, many indicated your veneer glue choice was the best route, because those glues were chosen because they were harder than common wood glues and such, so limited creeping of the veneer over time. Any input (the only "veneer" I've done is with laminates, like Formica, which don't take on or lose moisture).

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  • Hybrid Bandsaw Box - Custom Jewelry Box

    I'm having trouble deciding which did better, you or nature. Beautiful box.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Dominic Bender's instructable Fluorescent Acrylic Wand4 months ago
    Fluorescent Acrylic Wand

    PS I'm going to invest in some CA release (so, yeah, been there, done that too). It took me fifteen minutes to escape on of my turning blanks the other day using acetone. Guess I'd be smart to just buy the poly gloves that CA doesn't stick to.

    Fun project.I'm hoping to make an instructable about it in the next few days, but, meanwhile, consider picking up a / some toilet ring(s), for the wax, and some diatomaceous earth. Pumice can also get you down the road to a good finish, but I like the diatoaceous better. It does about what swirl mark remover for automotive paint finishes does.Mix the wax and diatomaceous earth or pumice by adding a teaspoon of turpentine (thinner might work too, but I haven't tried it yet). It will soften the wax and allow the two to mix. Of course, add more, if you need to.I sand down to 320, stop and switch to this and it works very well. Check out my plastic-wood turnings for an example of the results.

    Because I lucked out and was able to resuce several hundred pounds (my truck was squatting, litterally) of plastic of various thicknesses, colors and so on during a community clean up day, I looked into ways of welding plastics. In the end, specialty solvents and a hypodermic needle was the perfect answer. They are what the pro's use.I do use CA, but only to join the plastics to wood, and per the advice of others more learned in this kind of play than me, I stayed with medium CA. Initially, I'd used my 2:1 epoxy, but those blew apart on the lathe more often than did the CA.When using the solvents, you do need perfect joints. That can be a pain, but when you get them, the joints are invisible. In fact, the joined pieces become one.

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  • Copper Pumpkin in Proto-Pasta Copper Filament

    UNDERSTATEMENT FOLLOWS: This is impressive.

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  • KellyCraig commented on bekathwia's instructable 13 Ideas for Diffusing LEDs4 months ago
    13 Ideas for Diffusing LEDs

    I'm just starting to look to using LED's in a few projects they'd play well with. Of course, the more I play with them, the more facinating they become. For example, the effect of laying different colored plastics over different collored LED's quickly show the importance of pairing certain colors of LED's with certain colors of plastic or glass lenses.In the course of my very limited dabblings, I've noticed bright LED's still put off a lot of heat, which can compromise their longevity. Regarding the issue of heat, have you experimented with long term use projects that incorporated hot glue for diffusion, or that otherwise limit the ability of the LED's to shed heat and noticed a loss in dependability or longevity?

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  • Argumented Reality Glass - Very Very Cheap 2$, Easy Build, Run All Apps

    Way cool. Great job.

    Yep. Knew what you were saying, jegatheesan, though your wordage was off the mark, but I don't speak even a fraction of two languages, so am apprehensive about pointing out things like this. In the end, it remains this is an impressive project.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Bitter Blade Co's instructable Casting Brass Shavings in Resin!4 months ago
    Casting Brass Shavings in Resin!

    How long do you leave the mold in the pressue pot and under pressure. Do you apply pressure, then release it and apply it again, or is it a one shot thing?

    Interesting. I knew catalsised resin of any type couldn't care less about pressure or vacuum, but didn't realize how fast the Alumilite cures, compared to the 2:1 and other mixes I've used over the decades.

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  • I should note that when I go to the Plastic contest ("https://www.instructables.com/contest/plastics2018...), it demands I enter as someone who has not been here before, or jump from the site to write an instructable.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Magnets6 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Magnets

    A friend owns several claims in the Yucon. He took up metiorite hunting too. Since they use magnets to test finds, I, on a whim, made this walking stick, which uses about an ninety pound rare earth magnet.Obviously, from the photo, the magnet is strong enough the stick can support itself on my saw table top.

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  • KellyCraig commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for Magnets7 months ago
    Unusual Uses for Magnets

    Made this "Poor Man's Metal Detector" using a rare earth magnet with nearly 100lbs pull (I thought it was funny). In the picture, it's standing on its own atop my table saw.

    I had a problem in need of a solution with regard to a kitchen cabinet. The cabinet was near a double door, which has a curtain rod over it. Because of the rod, the cabinet door had to end just below it, to open. That ment the upper section had to be covered by a panel and the area would be inaccessible.To solve the problem, I made the panel removable and suspended it with rare earth magnets,

    I've bought many from https://www.kjmagnetics.com

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  • KellyCraig commented on Kink Jarfold's instructable DISK ROUND OVER JIG 7 months ago
    DISK ROUND OVER JIG

    Yep, you do [have a few years on me] and I knew that. My buddy was ninety-four and I called him kid too. After all, there are a lot of us seven and eight [or more] decade kids around.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Kink Jarfold's instructable DISK ROUND OVER JIG 7 months ago
    DISK ROUND OVER JIG

    Nice job, kid.1) Because router bits get dull and a dull bit can jump, consider putting a little piece of Plexi or similar over where the router bit. That would add a bit of safety in a few different ways. For example, it would limit how much the disk can jump.You could layer the plastic, if necessary, so it goes down past the top of your jig and just above the bearing or bushing.2) If you wanted to dedicate a bearing to this process, you can remove the bearing and grind off the mount, which would allow you to get the clear shield down lower to the bearing. I've done this with large, 1/2" shank bits to allow me to keep moving the bit over the wood to replicate a siding pattern.3) I make small push sticks I use, religiously, around my bandsaw and things that like to eat fingers ...

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    Nice job, kid.1) Because router bits get dull and a dull bit can jump, consider putting a little piece of Plexi or similar over where the router bit. That would add a bit of safety in a few different ways. For example, it would limit how much the disk can jump.You could layer the plastic, if necessary, so it goes down past the top of your jig and just above the bearing or bushing.2) If you wanted to dedicate a bearing to this process, you can remove the bearing and grind off the mount, which would allow you to get the clear shield down lower to the bearing. I've done this with large, 1/2" shank bits to allow me to keep moving the bit over the wood to replicate a siding pattern.3) I make small push sticks I use, religiously, around my bandsaw and things that like to eat fingers and such. With a rubberized tip, one could be used to roll the stock across the bit. Examples may be seen on the LumberJocks site at: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/105726Just modify the ends to your needs for a project like this (over forty years and still have my digits and no war wounds).

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  • 6 Tips to Building a Better Cross-cut Sled for Your Tablesaw

    Rather than spend money of expensive hardwoods for runners, I purchase 3/8" thick aluminum flat stock and cut it down to 3/4" widths for jig guides I use on my saws, router table and sanders.Making my own guides from aluminum is MUCH cheaper than buying guides, or making them from exotic woods.I've made so many guides, I bought an 8" carbide blade for non-ferrous metals and use it for aluminum and plastic. I haven't found need for more than the 8" blade and even a six would do for most things. Before the dedicated blade, I used one of my 60 tooth carbide blades with very little set (offset) to the teeth. They did great. I got good cuts. On a whim, I experimented with packing the teeth with canning wax (my wife isn't missing it, yet) and I covered the aluminum with ...

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    Rather than spend money of expensive hardwoods for runners, I purchase 3/8" thick aluminum flat stock and cut it down to 3/4" widths for jig guides I use on my saws, router table and sanders.Making my own guides from aluminum is MUCH cheaper than buying guides, or making them from exotic woods.I've made so many guides, I bought an 8" carbide blade for non-ferrous metals and use it for aluminum and plastic. I haven't found need for more than the 8" blade and even a six would do for most things. Before the dedicated blade, I used one of my 60 tooth carbide blades with very little set (offset) to the teeth. They did great. I got good cuts. On a whim, I experimented with packing the teeth with canning wax (my wife isn't missing it, yet) and I covered the aluminum with it. Rubbing it on to the piece being cut only takes seconds to do and it makes a night and day difference.The wax acts as a lube. Using it, the blade cuts notabley quieter AND the chips are not nearly as hot, as they bounce off my hands and arms. It, really, it worthwhile to use the wax.I wore both safety glasses and my face shield because of the chips being thrown. They're a lot meaner than the dust tossed cutting wood.I use a push shoe, rather than pathetic push sticks, since the shoes hold down about 11" of the stock at a time and stop any problematic chatter that might, otherwise, result.The flat stock I bought was about 8" wide and 4' long, so it gave me several guides for things like a log cutting, circle cutting, or [this] cut off sled, Kregg Hole pocket plugsleds (bandsaw) and so on for around the price of a single guide.Obviously, the aluminum is not affected by moisture and is quite durable.

    You could even use food coloring to mark the No-Hands-Zone.

    Good plan. It might be worthwhile to swap the screws out for a dowel screw and a knob.

    Yes, and no. Like Kent indicates, the digital lets you know the relation of the fence to the blade. To run a sled, you must remove the fence, to allow the sled to rest flat on the bed, where it is guided by two guides that run in the miter tracks.Since the miter track bars are permanently affixed, for the most part, a fence is unnecessary. Of course, since the guide bars and the back fence of the sled are calibrated to produce consistent ninety degree cuts, accuracy of set up is not an issue.Of course, you still have to check the cuts once in a while, such as if the sled has been dropped. Too, you need to insure no dust or chips is/are between your piece and the fence, and you must still line up your cuts, whether by eye or stop block.

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  • KellyCraig commented on thiswayhome's instructable Homemade Extension Cord Winder Mount8 months ago
    Homemade Extension Cord Winder Mount

    Your elaboration is where I was going: The amount of heat is an issue only if cables are pushing their amp/wattage limits. Of course, the amount of time the equipment is ran on the end of the cable is, nearly, as big an issue as cable size. A 14 gauge cable running a shop vac for fifteen minutes isn't going to get a lot of chance to build enough heat to damage the cable.Next, we jump to cable length - as you increase the cable length the more you may need to increase its size. If a cable is designed to handle 20 amps at 120 volts (about 2,400 watts) and is only using 12 amps (about 1,440 watts), much less heat is flowing through the line than it is designed to handle. If a very small shop vac were on a 12 gauge circuit, it could run a long time and heat may never be an issue.In the ...

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    Your elaboration is where I was going: The amount of heat is an issue only if cables are pushing their amp/wattage limits. Of course, the amount of time the equipment is ran on the end of the cable is, nearly, as big an issue as cable size. A 14 gauge cable running a shop vac for fifteen minutes isn't going to get a lot of chance to build enough heat to damage the cable.Next, we jump to cable length - as you increase the cable length the more you may need to increase its size. If a cable is designed to handle 20 amps at 120 volts (about 2,400 watts) and is only using 12 amps (about 1,440 watts), much less heat is flowing through the line than it is designed to handle. If a very small shop vac were on a 12 gauge circuit, it could run a long time and heat may never be an issue.In the end, knowing what size cord you're using, its length, the power demand of the device on the end of it, and a bit of knowledge about wattage/heat can keep you safe. If in doubt, how much hassle is it, really, to just unreel the beast?

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  • KellyCraig commented on The Woodgineer's instructable Carbide Woodturning Tool10 months ago
    Carbide Woodturning Tool

    They are, and I found I could bring them back to sharp just touching them up on my 1" x 42" belt sander (220).

    I was cleaning up some plastic I cut with a hole saw. It took a lot of sanding and polishing to get it back to mirror using sharp knives or my HSS scrapers. On a whim, I tried my carbide scraper and it produced finished surfaces quickly. I was VERY pleased. From that, building a few more would be well worth my time.

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  • Cyclonic Separator Shop-Vac With Secondary Water Filtration (Wet Scrubber) Made From Junk.. This Is Version Mark 2 of the Cyclonic Dust Collector Shop-Vac.

    The assertion water filters are flaws is only accurate in some circumstancesAs a contractor, I took on all kinds of jobs. One, about ten or twelve years ago, was to remove the paint from cedar shingles in the course of repairing shingled exterior walls on the oldest Queen Ann in Olympia, Washington.To perform the task, I used a tool called a Paint Shaver Pro. Essentially, this is an angle grinder with a head on which mounts three carbide scrapers. This awesome little tool will remove every layer of paint from a square foot of siding in about thirty seconds. Needless to say, it generates a LOT of dust. Much of that, in this instance, was, probably, lead paint.The Paint Shaver Pro had to be run with a vacuum, not only to capture dust, but to keep the tool cool, so it didn’t bur...

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    The assertion water filters are flaws is only accurate in some circumstancesAs a contractor, I took on all kinds of jobs. One, about ten or twelve years ago, was to remove the paint from cedar shingles in the course of repairing shingled exterior walls on the oldest Queen Ann in Olympia, Washington.To perform the task, I used a tool called a Paint Shaver Pro. Essentially, this is an angle grinder with a head on which mounts three carbide scrapers. This awesome little tool will remove every layer of paint from a square foot of siding in about thirty seconds. Needless to say, it generates a LOT of dust. Much of that, in this instance, was, probably, lead paint.The Paint Shaver Pro had to be run with a vacuum, not only to capture dust, but to keep the tool cool, so it didn’t burn out. The problem was, a vacuum filter would plug in a couple minutes. The better (finer micron) the filter, the quicker it would plug. To solve the problem, I built a water scrubber using a thirty gallon drum, a 3-M scrub pad and some plastic piping. I instaled the water scrubber between the vacuum and the Paint Shaver, because I wanted to reduce the frequent need to clean the filter.Details on the construction of my system are:1) The intake pipe, to which the pick-up hose attached, ran to just an inch or so off the bottom of the drum.2) The drum was about forty inches tall and had a removable top, sealed via metal band clamp.3) I poured water about twelve inches deep in the barrel, give or take a few inches.4) The 3-M scrub pad, like the type used for buffers, floated on top the water, to act as a baffle. Of course, it had a hole in it so it could slip over the pipe running to the bottom of the barrel.5) The vacuum pipe was only about six inches long and pulled air off the top of the barrel, well above the intake inlet and baffle.6) A sealed top was installed, and both the intake pipe and the vacuum hose pipe ran through it.The water filter increased run time of my large shop vac from a few minutes to about twenty or longer. The only problem was, you ended up with some real nasty mud, AND it foamed like a kid’s first laundry attempt.I came across an article about Oneida’s Dust Deputy and, after reading about it and other cyclone systems, took the risk and bought the metal version. I still have it today and use it religiously. In fact, it inspired me to buy three more cyclones for my shop dust collectors.Putting the two systems together, like in this ible, was a GREAT idea and, probably, would create one heck of a fine vacuum system. Just switching to the little Dust Deputy let me get the same performance (run time) I got with the water bath, and it allowed me to switch to a much smaller vacuum.Keep in mind, our old cars did great with oil bath filters, and many spray booths use water filtration systems, so it is a highly workable solution, if done right.Again, great job ibler.

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  • KellyCraig commented on noahw's instructable How to Polish Resin11 months ago
    How to Polish Resin

    While at the autoparts picking up buff compounds, pick up a bottle of plastic polish. You could even pick up a headlight lens polishing kit. They are perfect for the final polish on clear surfaces and, like other things in this ible, can be applied by hand.I have a few different bottles in my polishing area. One is from McGuires and another is the Mother's brand.

    If you are going to do very much polishing, consider getting some zip-lock bags to put the different buff pads in, so you can label the bag with the compound you used.You can always use a more coarse material, but you can't go back to a finer one. So the labeled bags keep you from contaminating the polishing wheels, heads and so forth with more coarse abrasives.

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  • KellyCraig commented on AroundHome's instructable Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw11 months ago
    Milling Short Logs on the Bandsaw

    I find it nothing less than comical that people bad math certain woods. It was even worse, years back. Today, many know they just didn't know (there is no bad wood (see note)).___________________________NOTE: If you can't make furniture from it, try turning it. If you can't turn it, cast it in epoxy and play with it.. . . .

    Sorry, but after several decades of sawdust making, Wikipedia loses and milling remains cutting, surfacing and shaping wood.

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  • PVC Extended Shade Frame for Craft Show Tents

    REALLY great tips. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on NikilH's instructable Poor Man's Buffing Wheel1 year ago
    Poor Man's Buffing Wheel

    I bought several packages of abrasive buff wheels and a package of buff wheels I use with my many commercial compounds and other things, like chromium oxide, baby powder, corn starch, diatomaceous earth, Bon Ami scrub powder and so on. That aside, I'll have to play with your ible idea to see if I can get this to fly on my two speed AirHandler buffer.ThanksP.S. One of my otherwise good wheels no longer worked on the arbor, since the hole had enlarged too much. On a whim, I threw some hot glue around the hole and it's been going strong ever since.

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    • Heavy Duty, Mobile Shop Cart From a Sheet of Plywood
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  • Shop Eye Glass Storage (Ceiling Mount- Adjustable)

    The other things aside, you hit the nail on the head - this site about sharing.My little shop is eighteen hundred square feet. In addition to the usual cabinet, band and miter saws, lathes and other woodworking equipment, it houses a carving machine, over-arm pin router, an electroplating station, a low RPM (less than ten) painting lathe, airless and HVLP spray guns and so on. The tools and equipment in my shop get used on a daily basis, since they are the means to the end of making a living (or buying more toys, uh, tools). As such, when I go out in the shop, it is, with few exceptions, more often with the idea of making a little money than documenting a process to donate to instructibles.Things like the eye glass rack in this instructible are, as a rule, done spur of the moment and o...

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    The other things aside, you hit the nail on the head - this site about sharing.My little shop is eighteen hundred square feet. In addition to the usual cabinet, band and miter saws, lathes and other woodworking equipment, it houses a carving machine, over-arm pin router, an electroplating station, a low RPM (less than ten) painting lathe, airless and HVLP spray guns and so on. The tools and equipment in my shop get used on a daily basis, since they are the means to the end of making a living (or buying more toys, uh, tools). As such, when I go out in the shop, it is, with few exceptions, more often with the idea of making a little money than documenting a process to donate to instructibles.Things like the eye glass rack in this instructible are, as a rule, done spur of the moment and on a whim, to solve some problem. Generally, all my shiny-thing-attention is, at least for the moment, focused on solving the problem.In the end, it boils down to that I have/had the choice of not producing an instructible at all, or taking pictures of a completed project, then taking the time to write about it and post here. Were it otherwise, it is more than probable you and others would never see many of my completed or future projects.All that said, I just built another cart for a new sander. During the build, I attempted to provide as many photos as I felt would help others build one, from an instructible. A review and critique of that ible would be helpful.https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Heavy-Duty-Mobile-Shop-Cart/

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  • Shop Eye Glass Storage (Ceiling Mount- Adjustable)

    Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, it, like too many things I post about, was done long before it became an instructable.Guess I need to come up with something else I can store hanging from the ceiling.

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  • Separate Hydrogen and Oxygen From Water Through Electrolysis

    Of course, you are going to have a circuit breaker in the system to protect the wiring. If using 14 gauge, that means you'd use a 15 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be about 1800 watts.If using 12 gauge, that means a 20 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be 2,400 watts.Things like the water heater use 10 gauge and require a 30 amp breaker. At 120 VAC, that would be 3,600 watts.For each gauge wire above, the amperage would trip the breakers for the corresponding wire gauges immediately. Even the main breaker of houses around here can handle only 200 amps.To play with that kind of amperage, and assuming 10 gauge wires, you'd have to be running no more than about 34 volts, but you'd have to go there without any breakers.[amps x volt = watts]

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  • KellyCraig commented on Pricklysauce's instructable Branding Nails1 year ago
    Branding Nails

    Great job on both the creations and the ible. Ingenius, even. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on imamanda's instructable Electroformed Turquoise Earrings1 year ago
    Electroformed Turquoise Earrings

    Great ible.Just for reference, when done with the plating process, there is no reason to waste distilled water neutralizing the bath covering plated items, or to rinse off the soda-water mix.Save your distilled water for topping off your plating bath.____________________As to protecting against the copper turning fingers green, many people use ProtectaClear and claim success. It's spendy, but a four ounce can goes a long ways, and if it works. . . .

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  • KellyCraig followed NurdRage1 year ago
      • Make a Tritium Nuclear Battery or Radioisotope Photovoltaic Generator
      • Recover Copper and Fully Recycle Spent Copper Chloride PCB Etchant
      • $50 Vacuum Pump That Can Boil Water at Room Temperature
  • KellyCraig commented on nathb1028's instructable Freeze Dry at Home1 year ago
    Freeze Dry at Home

    Thanks for sharing.I looked into freeze drying years ago and learned the Aztecs used to do it by merely taking their goods up into the mountains, where it was freezing and the air pressure was lower than where the food was grown, so I assume you don't have to get it down very low to start seeing results.From that, I wonder if a common automotive vacuum gauge have any value in monitoring the level of vacuum? Meanwhile, at a different ranch, I use polypropylene bags for my copper plating processes. The plating material has to roll off the copper or other anode in the bag, then through it and on to the item being plated in a plating solution. From that, my next "I wonder" is, would a polypropylene bag would make a handy container for holding the desiccant, to reduce the likelih...

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    Thanks for sharing.I looked into freeze drying years ago and learned the Aztecs used to do it by merely taking their goods up into the mountains, where it was freezing and the air pressure was lower than where the food was grown, so I assume you don't have to get it down very low to start seeing results.From that, I wonder if a common automotive vacuum gauge have any value in monitoring the level of vacuum? Meanwhile, at a different ranch, I use polypropylene bags for my copper plating processes. The plating material has to roll off the copper or other anode in the bag, then through it and on to the item being plated in a plating solution. From that, my next "I wonder" is, would a polypropylene bag would make a handy container for holding the desiccant, to reduce the likelihood of contact with the food?__________________________SIDE NOTE: As a kid, I worked a truck stop in a small farming town. We repaired a lot of tractor tires. They were filled with calcium chloride and I learned, very quickly, it would shrink a brand new pair of boots very quickly. So, even if it's in a water solution, once that water evaporates, it'll be more than happy to reach out and grab some more - from your soon to be ruined new boots.There you go, another ible explaining how to "grease" your new boots (replace lost moisture with oil or melted grease). Fun times?

    I'm a garage sale junkie. One of the things I like to pick up, for a buck or two, is nebulizers. They are used to deliver small amounts of medicinal product to individuals with health problems.After I get one, I pull the cover and swap the hoses so, instead of working as a lightweight compressor, the draw a vacuum.With the cover back on, I've been able to use them to pull the air from vacuum bags using a home made sealer I made from Corian(ish) and Plexi(ish) materials.Used in conjunction with a thermal sealer, the vacuum and sealer allow me to buy and use any company's bags (up to about 16" wide, for my unit). It beats being limited to some companies expensive, and often undersized, proprietary bags.

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  • KellyCraig followed Dunkiedoo1 year ago
      • PVC Extended Shade Frame for Craft Show Tents
      • Car Roof Rack Cross Bars
      • Tortilla Press
    • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders
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  • Build the Best Tomato Cages Ever!

    So, why on earth do hardware stores sell those tiny tomato cages? They are worthless anywhere real tomato plants grow.Cages like this could be marketed because they could be sold in packages of four panels each. They protect the plant from wind and the holes are large enough you can reach through them to pluck fruit.

    Based on decades of woodwork, working around cedar mills and handyman work, you are right - treated fir trumps cedar every time, for ground contact. For reference:1) Cedar will not take treatment as well as fir; and,2) Wood used above ground dries and shrinks, which causes cracking and splitting. For treating such woods, the best treatment is non-hardening oils. Unlike surface coats, they move with the wood, as it expands and contract with moisture. Too, it will not allow moisture in, then hold it in.To make the best use of oil, thin it, so it will penetrate the wood. Then apply it regularly. If the wood soaks it up, keep adding. Oil does not evaporate, though it may appear to. Instead, it wicks deeper and deep into the wood.When the oil saturates the wood, it swells it, just like ...

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    Based on decades of woodwork, working around cedar mills and handyman work, you are right - treated fir trumps cedar every time, for ground contact. For reference:1) Cedar will not take treatment as well as fir; and,2) Wood used above ground dries and shrinks, which causes cracking and splitting. For treating such woods, the best treatment is non-hardening oils. Unlike surface coats, they move with the wood, as it expands and contract with moisture. Too, it will not allow moisture in, then hold it in.To make the best use of oil, thin it, so it will penetrate the wood. Then apply it regularly. If the wood soaks it up, keep adding. Oil does not evaporate, though it may appear to. Instead, it wicks deeper and deep into the wood.When the oil saturates the wood, it swells it, just like water does. This will close small cracks and splits, and stop new ones from appearing, due to additional drying.

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    A couple were throwing away a pickup load (literally) of plastics. I rescued the plastic before it ever hit the dumpster and am using some for this project, as well as a variation which incorporates at least six angles on one piece of plastic.Since I was into making a few, I figured I'd make several sets for friends and an associate or two. THAT is where a CNC, with a trim router, would REALLY shine. It could even label each one with it's angle(s).

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    Yep. Shows to go you, you should always have your mind fully on whatever you're doing. I suspect I was thinking about bandsaw cuts at the same time I was tossing in a tid bit about taking advantage of your table saw for some of the cuts. Of course, they don't use sixty teeth per inch, but do rely on TPI for various thicknesses of wood, and for smoothness of cuts.You wouldn't have to torch the cuts. They'd already be melted [and probably welded back together].

    David, you might clarify, if my take is correct. You are proposing a method of laying out the lines that does not require buying or owning a protractor and bevel gauge, or an adjustable angle gauge?If so, you REALLY should do an ible, because it would be helpful to many.If you go that route, an explanation of why that approach is useful would be helpful too.

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  • Angle Set Up Gauges for Grinders and Belt Sanders

    Thanks for the catch, dwieland. That was a bit obvious to be left hanging out there. I can only imagine what a 60 TIP, 10" miter blade would look like and cost. At least you'd never have to sand anything it cut.

    David, many of us barely know what trig is. For example, I never graduated from high school, and I avoided classes on "complicated" things like chemistry, geometry and so on. As such, a bit more information to help those of us not familiar with such things would be helpful. Maybe an instructible using your, more simple approach?

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    • THE FIRST, HONEST WINE STOPPER  (or How to Establish or Grow Your Shop)
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      1 comments
    • Realistic Copper Plating Without Electricity (Paint Formula)
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      0 comments
  • Face Clamp Attachment (Get the Most Out of Your Clamps)

    Great innovation and layout. Thanks.

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  • KellyCraig commented on fghuertas's instructable Gouge, How to Make1 year ago
    Gouge, How to Make

    When I was polishing colored Plexiglass/Lexon disks cut out with my hole saw, using the square one cut the time I spent to a fraction of the time. Generally, the results did not require further sanding and polishing.I polish about ten disks at a time by fitting them over a carriage bolt the size of the pilot hole and clamping them with a nut, leaving enough bolt to go into the lathe. I use the live center on the opposite end.My 1"x48" belt sander touches the carbide up with just a quick touch on a 220 belt.

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