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  • Simple and Durable Hydroxy Gas Generator

    I take it, from your comments, that you are not familiar with Stanley Meyers' patent, which uses a "hydrolyzer-cell" to break down H2O into "HHO", also known as "Brown's Gas", and his unit DID run his VW-based 1.6L air-cooled engine "dune-buggy", without ANY pressurized storage tanks of hydrogen or oxygen, as far as he wanted to go, & as long as there was water in the tank, with just a pinch of salt to allow electrical conduction. (The salt stays in the water when the water is broken down into H-H-O.) It's also normally safer to vent the oxygen to the atmosphere than to try to put it into an engine; that was tried during WW-II on aircraft engines, and the engines usually melted. That resulted in Nitrous Oxide being found to work much better fo...

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    I take it, from your comments, that you are not familiar with Stanley Meyers' patent, which uses a "hydrolyzer-cell" to break down H2O into "HHO", also known as "Brown's Gas", and his unit DID run his VW-based 1.6L air-cooled engine "dune-buggy", without ANY pressurized storage tanks of hydrogen or oxygen, as far as he wanted to go, & as long as there was water in the tank, with just a pinch of salt to allow electrical conduction. (The salt stays in the water when the water is broken down into H-H-O.) It's also normally safer to vent the oxygen to the atmosphere than to try to put it into an engine; that was tried during WW-II on aircraft engines, and the engines usually melted. That resulted in Nitrous Oxide being found to work much better for a "brief but significant burst of extra power", (as long as a LOT of extra fuel is also added to preserve the fuel-air mixture ratio.) The point being, is that this system, if it produces enough H-H-O gas, can & will provide all the fuel one needs to power a small reciprocating-piston internal-combustion engine. If this design doesn't produce enough gas, then the "hydrolyzer" cell isn't being resonated properly, or more than one needs to be used. Since it doesn't appear to be designed to produce enough gas to run a 1.3L to 7.5L engine, but only to provide enough gas for a medium-temperature torch, it seems to have been well thought-out & implemented. The most important thing to always emphasize is: SAFETY FIRST! Always experiment outside, in a place where other people or property can't be harmed, (remember that only a small latex-balloon full of acetylene can shatter windows quite a distance away if it ignites & there's air or oxygen inside with it, which is why any "acetylene device" is normally illegal to even possess, without the necessary paperwork, such as a Chemistry Teacher would have, to demonstrate various ways to generate powerful & potentially dangerous gases to a class), and to do all "due diligence" & studying ALL of the available existing "prior work" first; use safety glasses or face-shields, a good thick leather "wrap-around" apron, & make only tiny amounts of something until you're quite certain you know how much is "enough", and should a small amount of the combined gases (H+O) find a spark, also be wearing hearing protection, & have a flash-arrestor in the gas-generator line, to avoid a "bang!" from becoming a "KA-BOOM!" For a small, moderate-temperature torch, this basic method was also patented, and it works quite well. It will not replace an oxy-acetylene gas torch, but for the "in-between" torch temperatures, there's the simple propane torch, the oxy-propane torch, or a MAPP-gas torch, for higher temperatures, depending on what maximum temperature is desired, and how much range-of-temperature is desired. This model is a nicely thought-out example of a small device; it doesn't appear to be intended to run a car, or replace other gas mixtures for higher-temperature uses. Thumbs-up for the use of nice wood & good woodworking, and being careful about not allowing any sparks to get to the gas-generating areas! (The other comments about not using stainless-steel are valid; just put a pinch of salt or other safe material in the water to make it conduct; the chromium in the stainless is going a bit "overboard", and CAN be hazardous, as far as waste-products go.) All-in-all, this one gets a "Well-Done!" from this "Old-Timer"...

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  • Build a World's Smallest Electronic Shocker!

    ...And for the FYI, Sam Clemens, a.k.a. Mark Twain, (who was Tesla's close personal friend), also said he "greatly enjoyed" having Nikola draw an arc to himself, then pass it to Twain, who would pass it to someone else or to a grounded object. When it comes to N. Tesla, I've done more than my share of homework, and I'm aware of the photos you're referring to; those aren't the one's I was referring to, though. "No Harm, no foul" :)

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