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  • How to Make a Pine Cone Chandelier

    That's a beautiful piece! Do you know what its finished dimensions are (diameter and height)? It looks pretty large in the photos, but the components look tiny nested on your material for cutting.

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  • How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe

    It takes the hot, moist air from the compressor pump, cools it, and separates out the water before sending the air to the storage tank. The section of two-inch copper pipe (vertical at bottom left) is filled with copper wool and directs any moisture down to the bottom of the pipe, where an automatic drain valve dumps the water every time the compressor runs. It's completely passive, so no power is needed, and it does a very good job of drying the compressed air (not quite as good as the ones that refrigerate the air, but good enough). You can do something similar using an automotive A/C condenser in the place of my long copper tubing radiator.

    Before we got a rotary compressor with an integrated dryer at work, we were using piston compressors with no dryers. During our humid season, the tanks would get so full of water, if they weren't drained every couple of hours, that water would spray out of the tools' exhaust ports. On a really bad day, you could shoot water out of the lines, like they were water hoses! Oiling tools does help protect them, but reasonably dry air is where you should start. We're in the middle of the humid season right now, and my home-built dryer seems to be doing the job quite well.

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  • schuylergrace commented on JulioC150's instructable How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe10 months ago
    How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe

    Great tutorial! One little refinement I might add is to heat the entire joint just to the point where you can melt the solder at the top of the joint (away from where the torch was heating) with the flame heating the joint. That ensures all the components are hot enough (but not too hot) to melt the solder on their own and make a sound joint. Also, particularly on larger joints, heating the joint ahead of and away from where you are trying to get the solder to flow will pull solder into any vacant spots. Heading directly where you want it to flow will just drive the solder away.

    I've used standard copper water pipe for compressed air lines (~135 psi) for years with no issues. In North America, you can get a heavier grade (Type L -- usually with blue markings) and the standard grade (Type M -- red markings). There is also even heavier green, Type K tubing that's made for underground use, but that's a waste of money for air lines. I usually end up soldering it with lead-free solder, because that's what I generally have around, but standard tin/lead solder is a little easier to work with. If you are using a piston-type compressor, which vibrates when it's running, I'd recommend attaching a flexible line between the compressor and your copper air line plumbing to avoid work-hardening the copper, which makes it brittle and prone to cracking. Rotary compressors o...

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    I've used standard copper water pipe for compressed air lines (~135 psi) for years with no issues. In North America, you can get a heavier grade (Type L -- usually with blue markings) and the standard grade (Type M -- red markings). There is also even heavier green, Type K tubing that's made for underground use, but that's a waste of money for air lines. I usually end up soldering it with lead-free solder, because that's what I generally have around, but standard tin/lead solder is a little easier to work with. If you are using a piston-type compressor, which vibrates when it's running, I'd recommend attaching a flexible line between the compressor and your copper air line plumbing to avoid work-hardening the copper, which makes it brittle and prone to cracking. Rotary compressors operate smoothly enough that this isn't an issue. Depending on the flow I need, I use either 1/2" tubing, or 3/4" tubing. Below is an image of the passive dryer I made for my home workshop...note that there are a small amount of copper and a few solder joints involved...and not even a pinhole leak anywhere to be found... :)

    Thank you!

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  • How to make Pressed Penny Wind Chimes (+ Sound file)

    In the U.S., it's only illegal to modify currency to make it into something that passes for another denomination. In other words, changing a $1 bill to appear to be a $20 bill and passing it off as a $20 bill. Other than that, you can just go nuts squishing coins, making rings out of them, drawing on paper currency, etc.

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  • How to Make French (Dill Pickle) Fries

    If you like crispier fries, follow the instructions above, but while the fried fries are draining, raise the temp of your oil about 25F higher than your frying temp (but not to smoking), and fry the fries, again! The first frying cooks the potatoes, and the second one crisps the outside.

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